ESL first graders science activity

 Here are some of the science experiments I used with my ESL first graders.  Although these were intended for science class, most of the activities can be modified for warm-up, motivational activities and/or just activities to break the monotony of classroom setting.
1
Title:  CAN YOU SCORE?
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         Empty 2-liter soda bottle
§         Small piece of paper (ball)
§         Hair dryer
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Take an empty, 2-liter soda bottle and lay it on its side. 
2.      Ball up a small piece of paper so that it will fit through the mouth of the bottle.
3.      Hold a hair dyer so it blows directly on the mouth of the bottle.
4.      Try to push the paper into the bottle using the air stream from the hair dryer.  What do you think will happen to the paper?  You’ll have to try it!
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:
EVALUATION:
Answer the following:
1.      Were you able to push the paper inside the bottle?
________________
________________
2.  How many of your friends were able to push the paper inside the bottle?
_________________
_________________
  1. What happen to the paper?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
        _________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________
2
Title:  TO EAT OR NOT TO EAT
INTRODUCTION:
        Plants are called producersbecause they are able to use light energy from the Sun to produce food (sugar) from carbon dioxide and water.Animals cannot make their own food so they must eat plants and/or other animals. They are called consumers. There are three groups of consumers.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        Integrated Science and Technology I

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        Pond water
·        Aquarium water
·        Canal water
·        Medicine dropper
·        3 microscope slides
·        3 cover slips
·        microscope
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.      Observe the different water samples in their bottle containers. Use the dropper to get water sample from the surface of the aquarium.
2.      Place a drop of water on a slide, cover slip; then, look under the low power objective (LPO).  Examine closely and draw the organisms.
3.      Repeat, using the other water samples.
4.      Repeat #2 and #3 until enough organisms have been viewed.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
1.     Draw your observation inside the circle
Oval: POND Oval: AQUARIUM Oval: CANAL

 

 

2.     Which water sample has more organisms? Why?
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.     Which organisms are producers?
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
4.     Which are consumers?
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3
Title:  OUTTA SIGHT!
INTRODUCTION:
          We see objects because light rays reflect off them and into our eyes.  But light bends each time it hits a substance of a different density.  The light reflecting off the penny must pass through air, glass and water (all with different densities) to get to your eye but the light bends so many times that by the time it gets to your eye, it looks like it’s someplace it’s not!
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:  
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         A coin
§         Clear glass with water
§         Saucer
§         White piece of paper
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Place a penny on a white piece of paper.
2.      Put a clear glass filled with water on top of the penny.  Can you see the penny?  Where is the best place to see it?
3.      Now, place a saucer on top of the water glass.
4.      Try to find the penny without looking straight down through the water glass.  Can you do it?
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:
EVALUATION:
Answer the following questions:
1.      When you put the glass of water on top of a penny, did you see the penny?
_________________________
_________________________
2.      Where is the best place to see the penny?
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
3.      When you place a saucer on top of the glass of water,  did you see the penny? 
_________________________
_________________________
CONCLUSION:
        _________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________
4
Title:  RACING JARS
INTRODUCTION:
        Initially, the water-filled jar moves down the ramp faster than the empty one.  This happens because its weight is evenly distributed throughout its volume, thanks to the water inside it.  The empty jar’s weight is all in the glass perimeter so it doesn’t roll quite as fast.  But as the jars begin rolling on the flat surface, the greater weight of the jar causes friction between the jar and the floor as well as friction between the water and the inside of the jar.  The full jar slows down, allowing the lighter, empty jar to take the lead!
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:  
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         2 identical clear glass jars with lid
§         Water
§         Binder (for ramp)
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Take two identical clear-glass jars, leave one empty, and fill one with water.
2.      Put the lids on both jars and tighten.
3.      Place a large, three-ring binder on a level floor, and start the jars from the top of the “ramp” the binder forms.
4.      Release them and watch what happens.
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:
EVALUATION:
        Answer the following:
1.      Which one gets to the bottom of the ramp first?
__________________________
__________________________
2.      Which one rolls the fastest?
__________________________
__________________________
3.      Which one rolls the slowest?
__________________________
__________________________
CONCLUSION:
        _________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________
5
Title:  RISING H2O
INTRODUCTION:
A barometer is an instrument used to measure the air pressure. Changes in the barometric pressure occur during changes in the weather. These changes can be fast or slow, drastic or subtle. Go to my forecasting page for a guide.
        In this experiment, the amount of air within the bottle is fixed at whatever the atmospheric pressure was on the day you turned the bottle upside down.  The pressure on the surface of the water depends on the current air pressure.  As the weather becomes drier, the air pressure increases, forcing the water to rise in the bottle.
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         Empty soda bottle
§         Plastic measuring cup
§         Colored water
§         Marker
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      On a rainy or stormy day, flip an empty soda bottle upside down into a glass measuring cup that has a spout and contains some colored water. 
2.      The bottle must fit snugly in the measuring cup so that the lip of the bottle will not touch the bottom of the cup.
3.      Make sure that the water in the cup extends into the neck of the bottle.
4.      Mark a line on the cup to indicate the water level within the bottle.
5.      When the weather turns sunny, reexamine the water level within the bottle.  Did it change? Why?
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:
EVALUATION:
Answer the following:
1.      What is the use of a barometer?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________
2.      What happened to the colored water when you checked it during sunny day?
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      Why the water level decreased?
_________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
        _________________________________________________
    _________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________        _________________________________________________
6
Title:  YEAST FACTORY
INTRODUCTION:
        Yeasts are single-celled (unicellular) fungi, a few species of which are commonly used to leaven bread, ferment alcoholic beverages, and even drive experimental fuel cells. Most yeasts belong to the division Ascomycota, though some are Basidiomycota. A few yeasts, such as Candida albicans, can cause infection in humans (Candidiasis). More than one thousand species of yeasts have been described. The most commonly used yeast is Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which was domesticated for wine, bread, and beer production thousands of years ago.
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        Integrated Science and Technology I

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        1 teaspoon Yeast
·        ½ teaspoon sugar
·        10 ml distilled water
·        microscope
·        glass slide
·        cover slip
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.    Grow yeast culture by mixing a teaspoon of yeast, one-half teaspoon of sugar and 10 ml of distilled water in a beaker.  Keep the beaker in a warm place.
2.    After a few minutes, put a drop of the culture in a glass slide, cover with the cover slip and look under the microscope, using low power objective (LPO).
3.    Count the number of yeast within the range of the viewed area.  Record the number.
4.    Repeat steps 2 and 3 the following day until the following meeting
5.    Graph your observation
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
1.     Make a drawing of the yeast in the LPO.

 

 

2.     Make a drawing of the yeast in the HPO.

 

 

3.     Describe the yeast as seen through the microscope.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
4.     How many yeast are there?
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
5.     Graph your observation.
6.     In what day was the yeast population at its highest?
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
7.     In what day was the yeast population at its lowest?
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
7
Title:  CHECKING AIR POLLUTANTS
INTRODUCTION:
Air pollution is a toxic contaminant or Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) that is released in the air. All over the world oil and coal are burned to run factories and machinery. The burning of these fuels creates by-products, such as smoke and invisible irritants, which contaminate our atmosphere. The combined effect of air pollution seriously damages the environment and can cause health problems to humans.
Air Pollution Sources:
Vehicles, gas stations, forestry, chemical industry, mills, smoke etc.
Air Pollution Effects:
     
The effects of air pollution are a major threat to our health. Pollution can cause illnesses such as lung diseases, asthma, bronchitis and emphysema.
     The air pollution has serious effects on our environment. Contaminant particles, which are released into the air through factories, power plants and cars, combine with water particles in the atmosphere and fall to the earth in the form of rain or snow (acid rain).When acid rain falls into bodies of water that contain living organisms, those living organisms are threatened through contamination.
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
§         Science Experiments, Vol. 1 p. 91
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         3 index cards
§         String
§         Tape
§         Scissors
§         Magnifying lens
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Make a hole in each index card with the scissors.
2.      Cover the holes in the index cards with the transparent tape.
3.      Make small holes at the top of the cards to attach the strings.
4.      Hang the cards in three different locations.
5.      Let them be there for a week and then check them.
ü      You will find pollutants attached on the tape.  The air particles floating in the air get fixed on the tape.  Some are so small that you can see them through a magnifying lens only.
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
Answer the following:
1.     After 1 week, did you able to find air pollutants in your experiment?  (Answer may vary.)
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
2.     Which set-up has more pollutants in it? (Answer may vary.)
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.     List three causes of air pollution.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
4.  List three effects of air pollution.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:

 

 

8
Title:  FLOATING CLIPS
INTRODUCTION:
The surface of the water bends around the weight of the paperclip like stretched rubber.  This is because water has surface tension.
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:  
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         Paperclips
§         Water
§         Bowl
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Bend a paperclip into an “L” shape.
2.      Use this clip to gently lay another paperclip on the top of the water in a glass.  What happended?
Tip:  Do not disturb the water for few minutes.
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:
EVALUATION:
Answer the following:
1.      Were you able to float the paperclip?
_______________________________
_______________________________
2.      How many of your classmates were able to float paperclips?
_______________________________
_______________________________
3.      What force make the paperclips float?
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
        _________________________________________________
9
Title: LET’S TAKE A LOOK ANYWHERE
INTRODUCTION:
Oil causes the food coloring to circulate in the milk making swirls of color.
This is caused because milk is mostly water and some fat. The oil is only soluble in the fat. The oil creates a current which causes the colors to circulate mix.
        Note:  The milk must not be disturbed for the experiment to work properly.
RELATED HOW-TO INFO:
§         Nervous Colours, Kitchen Science, page 8
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§   Milk (in a glass or single serving carton with the lid cut off)
§   Food colors
§   Vegetable oil
§   A table to place the milk on
 
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:        
1.    Put milk in a glass or cut the lid off a carton. 2% or higher  
    fat content works the best.
2.    Place one drop of each color of food coloring in each corner of the carton or near the sides of the glass.
3.    Place a drop of vegetable oil in the middle. Be careful not to move the glass or to shake the table. After a short time the colors swirl and mix, it looks really cool. Try it with different fat amount and see how it affects the patterns or the rate of swirling.
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
         
       Fill in the blanks with the following words:
              OIL         MILK              FAT
             
1.     __________ causes the food coloring to circulate in the milk making swirls of color.
2.   ____________ is mostly water and some fat.
3.   The oil is only soluble in the ___________.
CONCLUSION:
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
10.
Title:  THE SUBMARINER
INTRODUCTION:
          By squeezing the bottle, you increase the pressure inside, thus forcing more water up into the pen cap.  The added water in the cap increases its weight and causes the cap to sink.
RELATED HOW-TO INFO:  —-
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:  
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         Plastic pop bottle with cap
§         Clay
§         Water
§         Plastic pen cap
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Fill a plastic bottle with water.  Attach a small piece of clay on the arm of a plastic pen cap.
2.      Place the cap in the bottle so it floats and seal the bottle tightly.
3.      Squeeze the sides of the bottle.  What happens?  Why?
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:
EVALUATION:
Answer the following:
1.      What happen to the pen cap when you squeeze the bottle?
_________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
2.      Did the cap sink or float?
_________________________________________________
_________________________________________________
3.      Name the materials you used in this experiment:
__________________________
__________________________
    __________________________
    __________________________
CONCLUSION:
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
11.
Title:  VANISHING LIGHT
INTRODUCTION:
          When vinegar reacts with baking soda, carbon dioxide gas is produced.  This gas id heavier than air so it sinks to the bottom of the bowl and slowly begins to fill up the bowl as though it were water.  When the level of carbon dioxide has risen to the level of the flame, the flame will go out from lack of air.
RELATED HOW-TO INFO:
§         Fantastic Fire Extinguisher
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:  
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         A short candle
§         A long candle
§         Small dish
§         Baking soda
§         Vinegar
§         Beaker
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Place a short candle, a slightly taller candle and a small dish or small glass filled with baking soda in the bottom of a large bowl.
2.      Light both candles.
3.      Then pout vinegar into the dish of baking soda.
4.      Observe the foaming reaction.   What happens to the candles?  Why?
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
Answer the following:
1.      What happened to the candles inside the bowl?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________
2.      Which flame went out first?  The small or the long candle?
_________________________________________________
_________________________________________________
3.      What gas is produced when mixing the baking soda and vinegar?
_________________________________________________
_________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
12.
Title:  A TRIP WITH THE TINY CREATUES
INTRODUCTION:
An ant colony is an underground lair where ants live. Colonies consist of a series of underground chambers, connected to each other and the surface of the earth by small tunnels. There are rooms for nurseries, food storage, and mating. The colony is built and maintained by legions of worker ants, who carry tiny bits of dirt in their mandibles and deposit them near the exit of the colony, forming an anthill.
Ant colonies are eusocial, and are very much like those found in other social Hymenopterans, though the various groups of these probably developed sociality independently through convergent evolution. Eggs are laid by one or sometimes more queens. Queens are different in structure, they are the largest ones among all ants, especially their hi and thorax which are bigger than most ants. Their tasks are to lay eggs and produce more offspring. Most of the eggs that are laid by the queens grow up to become wingless, sterile females called workers. Periodically swarms of new queens and males called alates are produced, usually winged, which leave to mate. The males die shortly thereafter, while the surviving queens either found new colonies or occasionally return to their old one. The surviving queens can live up to around 15 years.
People raise ant colonies in captivity for research and as a hobby. An “ant terrarium” used for this purpose is called a formicarium. They are often made thin enough that you can see the entire colony inside their nest. These are called ant farms.
Until 2002, the largest known ant colony was on the Ishikari coast of Hokkaido, Japan. The colony was estimated to comprise of 306 million worker ants and 1 million queen ants living in 45,000 interconnected nests over an area of 2.7 km2.[1][2] In 2002, a super-colony of connected nests was found to stretch nearly 6000 km across Europe.[3] Another, measuring approximately 100 km wide, was found beneath Melbourne, Australia in 2004.[4]
Ant colonies have inspired a technique in computer science known as ant colony optimization.
A formicarium is an insectarium which is designed primarily for the study of ant colonies and behaviour. Those who study ant behaviour are known as myrmecologists.
Formicariums are widely known to the public as ant farms. An ant farm is an ant colony enclosed by a transparent box (a formicarium usually made of glass or plastic). It is a registered trademark of Uncle Milton Industries, Inc. Milton Levine is credited with creating the toy in 1956 after watching ants parade through a picnic. The company has sold over 20 million Ant Farms and is still family owned.  They are usually made thin enough so the tunnels and cavities made by the ants can be seen, and for their behavior to be studied. Ant farms are popular “pets” for school projects.
Ants are social animal.  They maintain the place they live in.  Each one has one function, which helps its colony survive.
The ants are segregated into queen ant, male ant and worker ant.
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
§         Science Experiments, Vol. 1 , page 46
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         Large wide-mouthed glass jar
§         Small glass jar
§         Muslin cloth
§         Rubber band
§         Moist soil
§         Fresh left-over foods
§         Male and female ants
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Put the moist soil in the large jar about 5 cm high. 
2.      Collect ants in the small jar and place it upside down in the large jar.
3.      Fill the excess space in the large glass jar with soil.
4.      Add some fresh food to the top layer of soil in the large jar.
5.      Place a piece of muslin cloth over the lid of the jar and secure it with a large rubber band.
6.      Observe your new ant farm and keep watching it.
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:

 

EVALUATION:
  Answer the following questions:
1.    Describe your ant farm.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
2.    What are the three groups of ants?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
13.
Title:  LOOKING CLOSELY WITHOUT A MICROSCOPE
INTRODUCTION:
        Science is about testing – and about looking closely.  Some scientists use microscopes to take a close look.  We’re going to use a simple piece of paper.
        Looking is really science!  After the experiment, you will know how to observe and describe things in nature.  Many scientists observe and describe everyday they work.
RELATED HOW-TO INFO: 
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         Print out of an inch square
§         Something to study (e.g. a tree trunk, a leaf, a flower, etc.)
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.          Cut out the square to make a “window” one inch square.  (It’s easiest to fold the page in half before you cut.)
2.          Choose something interesting: a tree trunk, a leaf, flower, the soil surface, etc..
3.          Put your window over the thing and look at it closely.  Take your time – this is not a race.
4.          To help you see more details, draw a picture of what’s inside your square.
5.          Share what you’ve found!
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:
EVALUATION:
Record what you saw using your 1”square window.  (Answers may vary.)
§        Was it:
Hot or cold?           _______________
Wet or dry?           _______________
Hard or soft?          _______________
Bright or dark?              _______________
Smooth or rough?   _______________
Alive or not?          _______________
§        How many colors did you see? _____________
§        How many shapes?               _____________
§        Was it moving or not?           _____________
§        What did you find out?  
______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________  
CONCLUSION:
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
14.
Title:  MUMMY MAGIC!
INTRODUCTION:
The mummification of the apple may take up to two weeks. Other suggestions for the mummification process: try using chickens or game hens. Adjustments would have to be made to the amount of Natron Solution used and the time allotted for the experiment. The Ancient Egyptians believed that mummification was necessary for eternal life. The soul needed a body to which to return. Challenge your children to research the afterlife beliefs of the Ancient Egyptians. Also challenge your children to research other cultures that practiced mummification. What other substances did the Ancient Egyptians use to make mummies? How did the Ancient Egyptians discover Natron? How long does it take for your apple to be mummified? What changes to the apple did you observe during the mummification process?
The Natron Solution dries the apple just as it would dry a human body to make a mummy. By eliminating moisture, you have eliminated the source of decay. Natron is made up of four salts: sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride, and sodium sulfate. The sodium carbonate works as a drying agent, drawing the water out of the body. At the same time the bicarbonate, when subjected to moisture, increases the pH that creates a hostile environment for bacteria.
RELATED HOW-TO INFO:
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         1/2 apple
§         1 popsicle or craft stick
§         1 medium-sized plastic bags that seals
§         Natron Solution: 1/4 cup table salt, 1/2 cup sodium carbonate (powder bleach), and 1/2 cup baking soda
§         Stir together–this makes enough to do one apple. You may maximize this recipe as necessary
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Make the Natron solution (recipe above) in the plastic bag.
2.      Carve a face into the apple with the popsicle stick then stick the popsicle stick into the apple so you have a handle (like you were making a candy apple).
3.      Dip the apple into the Natron Solution until the face is covered, and leave the apple in the bag.
4.      Leave the bag open in a straight position to allow air to flow.
5.       Record your observations as your apple mummifies.
6.      What happens to the apple once it is covered with the Natron Solution? How much time does it take for the apple to turn into a “mummy”?
Safety precautions: DO NOT eat the apple or the Natron Solution; wash your hands after the activity and don’t touch your eyes or mouth until you wash your hands. You might want to wear plastic safety goggles.
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:
        Things You'll Need Graphic   Pouring Graphic   Carving Apple Graphic   Dipping Apple Graphic   Apple In Natron Graphic
EVALUATION:
        Answer the following questions:
1.     What happens to the apple once it is covered with the Natron Solution?
______________________________________________________________________________________________
2.    How much time does it take for the apple to turn into a “mummy”?  (Answer may vary.)
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
15.
Title:  LET’S PLAY WITH PLANTS
INTRODUCTION:
          Plants have four major parts.  Every part has a job.
The ROOTS hold a plant in place.  Roots take water and things from the soil called minerals up to the rest of the plants.
The STEM holds up the leaves and flowers.  Stems have little tubes in them that work like a straw.  They take water and food to the rest of the plant.
The LEAVES make food for the plant.
The FLOWERS make seeds for the plants.  The seeds grow into new plants.  Flowers make seeds to grow new plants.
RELATED HOW-TO INFO:  
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         One potted flowering plants
§         Several flowering plants pulled up by the roots
§         A large poster of the parts of a plant
§         Word cards
§         Stalk of celery
§         2 cups
§         Food color  (red and blue)
§         Water
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
A.      Pre-lab discussion
B.      Experiment
1.      Get your stalk of celery. 
2.      Make a long slit into the stem.
3.      Place half in red colored water and half in blue colored water.
4.      Watch the celery for changes.
C.      Post-lab activity
  First, we will color our plant, then we will cut out our word cards to label or picture.  Follow the instructions.  Find the roots, color them yellow.  Find the stem, color it green.  Find the leaves, color them green.  Find the flower, color it whatever color you wish.  Now, add a few brown dots for seeds in your flower.  Cut out the word cards and glue it to its proper place.
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:

 

EVALUATION:
Draw and label the four major parts of plants.

 

 

     
            ROOTS                     STEM

 

 

                LEAVES                         FLOWERS
CONCLUSION:
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
16.
Title:  KINGDOM PLANTAE EXIGENCY
INTRODUCTION:
All plants need these seven things to grow: room to grow, the right temperature, light, water, air, nutrients, and time.

Room to grow

All plants like to have room to grow. The above ground portions of the plant need space so leaves can expand and carry out the job of making food. Roots also need room to grow. Plants growing in small spaces will have their roots crowded, and that results in smaller amounts of growth.

 Temperature

Most plants like temperatures that most humans like. Some may like warmer temperatures while others may prefer cooler temperatures for best growth. It is always good to know where plants come from so you can make them feel at home. Most plants like to have cooler temperatures at night and don’t like to be in a drafty spot.

Light

Plants grown indoors like bright light. Windows facing the south or west have the best light. Try to place the plants close to the window to take advantage of all the light. The further away from the window, the darker it becomes. A plant will tell you when it isn’t getting enough light, because its stems will be thin and it will lean toward the light. If you don’t have a bright window, try using grow lights. Remember to have the light about 6 inches above the plants and leave it on for 14-16 hours each day.

 

Water

Water is important in the plant’s ability to make and move nutrients. Without water or with too much water, a plant dies. For this reason, watering is an important part of plant care. Most plants like to be watered when the soil is slightly dry to the touch. When watering, moisten the soil by using enough water so that it starts to come out of the hole in the bottom of the container. (This is why it is important to use containers with drainage holes.) How often you water depends on a lot of things. Plant size, time of the year, and type of plant are a few. Your best guide, though, is to feel the soil. If you stick your finger one inch into the soil and it is dry, then water your plant.

Air

Plants use carbon dioxide in the air and return oxygen. Smoke, gases, and other air pollutants can damage plants.
Nutrients
Most of the nutrients that a plant needs are dissolved in water and then taken up by the plant through its roots. Fertilizers will help to keep the soil supplied with nutrients a plant needs. Don’t apply too much too often. Fertilizer won’t solve all of your plant problems, so make sure your plants have good light, good soil, and good drainage. The three most important nutrients are nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium.
Nitrogen is used for above ground growth. This is what gives plants a dark green color. Phosphorous helps plant cell division. It aids in flower and seed production and in the development of a strong root system. Potassium helps fight off disease and provides for strong stems.

Time

It takes time to grow and care for plants. Some plants require more time to grow than others. Getting plants to flower or fruit at a certain time can be challenging. Plants that normally grow outdoors need a certain number of days to flower or fruit. You can time plants to flower or fruit on a certain date. This is a good lesson in both plant science and math.
RELATED HOW-TO INFO: 
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
§         One half-pint milk cartoon for each child
§         Potting soil
§         Spoon
§         Cup
§         Water
§         Watering can
§         Soaked lima bean seeds for each child
§         Paper markers
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.       Get your milk cartoon.  Make holes in the bottom to allow water to pass.  Write your name and the date of planting.
2.       Put some soil in your cartoon. 
3.       Then add seeds to it.
4.       On the next days, observe your plants daily and put water if the soil feels dry.
5.       Put your planted seeds in a sunny window.
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP:
Animation of Fertilizer       
§         Take a seed and put it in a cartoon without soil.  Have the students compare it with their plant.
EVALUATION:
Answer the following:
1.    What are the needs of your plants?
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2.    What do you observed with your plants after few days?
(Answer may vary.)
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.    Can a plant grow well without soil?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
4.    Can a plant grow well without sunlight?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
17.
Title:  BLUE RED
INTRODUCTION:
        When an acid and a base are placed together, they react to neutralize the acid and base properties, producing a salt. The H(+) cation of the acid combines with the OH(-) anion of the base to form water. The compound formed by the cation of the base and the anion of the acid is called a salt. The combination of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide produces common table salt, NaCl. The word salt is a general term which applies to the products of all such acid-base reactions.
Substances have long been classified as acids or bases according to some general properties which are summarized below. Their reactions with each other produce salts.
Acid Properties:
When dissolved in water, acids
1.    Conduct electricity
2.    Change blue litmus to red
3.    Have a sour taste
4.    React with bases to neutralize their properties
5.    React with active metals to liberate hydrogen.
Base Properties:
When dissolved in water, bases
1.    Conduct electricity
2.    Change red litmus to blue
3.    Have a slippery feeling
4.    React with acids to neutralize their properties.

RELATED HOW-TO INFO: 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        Integrated Science and Technology I

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        Lemon juice
·        Salt solution
·        Banana
·        Pineapple
·        Milk of magnesia
·        Vinegar
·        Guava
·        Test tube (10)
·        Soap solution
·        Ammonia water
·        Fish sauce
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Test all the substances with the red and blue litmus paper.
2.      Dip your clean forefinger in the material and taste with the tip of your tongue; then, spit out.
3.      Feel carefully the materials with your thumb and the middle finger.  Wash your finger afterwards.  Record all of your findings.  From the findings, identify in the following table the tested materials as acid, bases or salts.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

EVALUATION:
1.     Complete the table. 
No
Materials tested
Acid
Bases
Salt
Red Litmus
Blue Litmus
Taste
Feel
1
Lemon juice
2
Fish sauce
3
Ammonia water
4
Banana
5
Soap solution
6
Milk of magnesia
7
Vinegar
8
Guava
9
pineapple
2.      What are indicators?
____________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      Which among the materials used are considered indicators?
____________________________________________________________________________________________
4.      Which among the materials used are considered acidic?
____________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
18.
Title:  GEE YOU SMELL TERRIFIC!
OBJECTIVE: To make a home-made perfume from petals

RELATED HOW-TO INFO: 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
Rose petals
Lilly petals
Orange peel 
Glass perfume bottles
Rubbing alcohol (scented)
Plastic spray bottles
Paper for labels
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.    Collect the flower petals, fruit peels, and herbs that you will use to make the different types of perfume. I used orange peels, grapefruit peels, lavender leaves, leaves, rose petals, and lily petals.
2.    Place material in each glass bottle and label each bottle. (Orange scent, grapefruit scent, lavender scent, eucalyptus scent, rose scent, and lily scent)
3.    Fill each perfume bottle to the top with rubbing alcohol. Cap or cork each bottle.
4.    Place the bottles in a sunny and dry place. An area that they will not be disturbed for several weeks.
5.    After one week observe by smelling each bottle and noting which bottle had the strongest-weakest scent.
6.    Repeat step 5 for a total of 4 weeks.
7.    Graph the data week by week.
8. After the 4 weeks, pour off a small amount of each bottle ( the final product) into a small spray bottles and label. This is for the display at the Science Fair. When the solution is sprayed on a piece of paper or your skin the alcohol will evaporate and the aromatic oils will stay on the paper or skin.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

EVALUATION:
1.      Spray a small amount of perfume in a piece of paper and paste it here.
2.      Which among the materials has the strongest smell before soaking?
____________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      Which among the materials has the strongest smell after soaking?
______________________________________________________________________________________________
4.     Which among the materials undergo changes in color?
____________________________________________________________________________________________
         
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
19.
Title:  POPPING SODA
OBJECTIVE: To explain the physical reaction between mentos and soda
BIBLIOGRAPHY:

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        A bag of mentos
·        2 liters of soda
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
          1. This activity is probably best done outside in the middle of an abandoned field, or better yet, on a huge lawn.
2.  Carefully open the bottle of soda. Position the bottle on the ground so that it will not tip over.
3. Unwrap the whole roll of Mentos. The goal is to drop all of the Mentos into the bottle of soda at the same time (which is trickier than it looks). One method for doing this is to roll a piece of paper into a tube just big enough to hold the loose Mentos. You’ll want to be able to position the tube directly over the mouth of the bottle so that all of the candies drop into the bottle at the same time.
4.  Don’t drop them into the bottle just yet! Warn the students to stand back. Okay, you’re going to drop all of the Mentos into the bottle at the same time.

EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

EVALUATION:
          1.  Make a drawing of your Mentos Explosion.

 

 

         
          2.  How big is the eruption?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
       
3.  What do you call this reaction between mentos and the soda?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
       
4.      What gas is naturally released in a carbonated drink?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
20.
Title:  RISING TEMPERATURE
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        My Book of Science Experiments, page 108.
ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:—
MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT:
·        Clear bottle with screw-top lid
·        Clear drinking straw
·        Modeling clay
·        Water
·        Ink
·        Hairdryer
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Fill a clear bottle about halfway with water into which you have mixed a few drops of ink.
2.      Make a hole in the lid of the bottle, large enough for s straw to fit through.
3.      Screw the lid into the bottle and push the straw through.
4.      Press modeling clay around the part where the straw goes into the lid to make an airtight seal.
5.      Carefully blow into the straw until the liquid comes about halfway up it.
6.      Blow hot air from a hairdryer to the bottle.
EXPERIMENATAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
1.      What happened to the colored liquid in the straw?
______________________________________________________________________________________________
2.      How many minutes did it take for the liquid to rise?
______________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      What will happen if you put the bottle in the refrigerator for a while?
______________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
21.
Title:  SEE SAW
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        My Book of Science Experiments, page 69

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        Plastic bottle with lid
·        Modeling clay
·        Nail
·        2 forks
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
         
1.      Push a nail into a small ball of modeling clay.  Then push two forks into the clay, one on either side.
2.      Now balance the whole thing on the point of the nail on top of a bottle. 
WHAT’S GOING ON?
The weight of the forks means that the center of gravity is under the point of the nail, so however you push it, it will not overbalance.  Tightrope walkers use the same idea when they hold a long pole.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
1.      Where does the center of gravity concentrated?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
2.      What other human activity demonstrate this principle?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      Which among the symbols below shows the direction of the pull of gravity?  Encircle your answer.

 

 

CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
22.
Title:  SINGING BUTTON
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        My Book of Science Experiments, page 80.

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        Large button
·        Thin, strong string, thread or twine
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.      Thread some string through two holes in a large button and join the ends to make a long loop as shown in the experimental set up.  Holding the ends loosely, swing the button around and around to wind up the string.
2.      Suddenly pull your hands apart to make the button spin.  Observe what happens.
What’s going on?
Loosening and tightening the string, the button will move so quickly that it will vibrate the air fast enough to make a humming sound
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
1.      Did the button create a sound?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
2.      Why did the button made some sound? 
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      What did you do in order to produce a sound?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
23.
Title:  HEAR MY HEARTBEAT
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        My Book of Science Experiments, page 89.

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        Plastic tube or hose about 1 meter (3ft) long
·        Funnel
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.      Push a funnel into on end of a 1-meter length of tube or hose.  Stand about a meter from a friend.
2.      Now ask him to hold the funnel to his chest, while you put the other end of the tube to your ear, still standing the same distance apart.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
1.      Describe the heartbeat of the following persons in the table by using the words SLOW and FAST. (ANSWERS MAY VARY)
PEOPLE
HEARTBEAT
1.  ME
2.  FRIEND (1)
3.  FRIEND (2)
2.      Can you hear your friend’s heart beating?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      What sound does his or her heart produce?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
4.      What instrument is used by doctors to hear the heartbeat of a person?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
24.
Title:  ARE YOU OR OUT?
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        My Book of Science Experiments, page 22

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        2 drinking glasses
·        warm water
·        salt
·        spoon
·        whole, raw egg
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

         

1.      Fill one glass with water and carefully place an egg in it.
2.      Fill another glass with water and mix as many spoons of salt as you can into it.
3.      Put the egg into this glass.
WHAT’S GOING ON?
Dissolving salt in water increases the water’s density.  A raw egg is denser than ordinary water but less dense than salty water.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
1.      Did the egg float in the glass with water only?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
2.      Did the egg float in the glass dissolved salt?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      What made the egg float in the second glass?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
25.
Title:  COLOR SPLASH
RELATED HOW-TO-INFO:
·        Early Learners:  The Big Book of Science Experiments, vol. 2, page 19
·        Biology Manual, page 15
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        My Book of Science Experiments, page 41

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE:—

MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT:
·        Blue ink
·        Blotting/ filter/ Whitman paper
·        Water
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
1.      Drop a small amount of ink on the blotting paper.  The color should spread a little.
2.      Drip a drop of water into the center of the color.  The color will spread out further.
WHAT’S GOING ON?
The spot at the center where color was concentrated will spread out.  Some of the dyes in the ink will travel across the paper more easily than others, so they will divide and show rings of different colors.

 

EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:
EVALUATION:
1.      Paste your chromatography paper here.
2.      Identify the colors seen in your chromatography.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      In this experiment, what medium was used?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
4.      Is it possible to separate the color in a flower or fruit using chromatography?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
26.
Title:  SQUISHY
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
MATERIAL & EQUIPMENT:
·        cornstarch
·        water
·        large bowls
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE
1.      Place a cup of cornstarch in a large bowl
2.      Add a ¼ cup of water to the cornstarch
3.      Take a handful and knead the mixture, like you would a bread dough
4.      Continue to exert pressure on the mixture
5.      Then, stop kneading the “batter”.  Observe what happen
WHAT’S GOING ON?
As soon as the pressure stops, the “batter” will revert to its original form and “pour” through your fingers.  Even though the cornstarch and water is a liquid, you can form the stuff into a ball if you can squeeze and knead it quickly enough.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:
EVALUATION
          Find 15 words in the crossword puzzle used in this experiment.        
c
o
r
n
s
t
a
r
c
h
u
g
s
d
a
e
h
x
z
z
c
c
h
o
i
u
j
f
o
g
k
b
a
t
t
e
r
c
f
i
j
u
c
v
s
t
s
q
e
s
h
y
g
o
t
r
d
y
e
h
b
c
l
k
i
t
w
s
t
o
P
e
i
o
y
o
t
i
y
a
e
x
s
a
n
d
r
i
c
n
i
i
t
f
s
c
g
h
r
y
a
g
q
g
y
o
t
n
b
f
d
v
a
i
d
f
f
k
d
i
c
x
u
s
h
l
n
k
u
f
w
a
t
e
r
g
t
d
y
f
h
x
e
n
j
k
u
y
x
z
v
u
e
n
b
o
b
o
w
l
y
h
e
t
c
d
h
b
h
k
y
i
d
e
c
l
l
u
i
u
f
r
z
h
u
u
i
s
f
f
g
j
p
b
v
k
j
g
j
i
a
a
e
h
p
r
e
s
s
u
r
e
j
q
x
q
a
h
h
d
g
h
f
f
i
p
p
d
n
k
l
j
e
a
r
w
s
f
s
f
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
27.
Title:  LUCKY 7
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        My Book of Science Experiments page 19

ALSO TRY THIS WEBSITE: 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        Indicator strips
·        Clean jam-jar
·        Vinegar
·        Soap powder
·        Teaspoon
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.      Put some vinegar into a jar and test it with an indicator strip.

2.     Add some soap powder to the vinegar (stirring it around to help it dissolve) and test again.
3.     Depending on how much soap powder you added, the mixture is now less acid or even slightly alkali.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

EVALUATION:
1.      Color and label your indicator strip after dripping it into the vinegar.

 

 

2.      What does the color in the indicator strip mean?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      What happened to the color on the indicator strip after adding the soap powder to the vinegar?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
                                                           
4.      Was there any change in the color in the indicator strip after adding the soap powder? What does this mean?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
28.
Title:  GREEN LEAFY
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        Biology Manual: Ateneo de Davao University
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        leaf
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

6.    Students will obtain a leaf.
7.    Examine each part
8.    Name each part of the leaf.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:


EVALUATION:
          1.Draw and label the parts of a leaf.

 

 

2.      Fill in the blanks.
a.     It holds the entire leaf ……………
b.     The green, flat portion of a leaf is called ………….
c.      The tip portion of the leaf is called ………..
d.     The central vein of the leaf is called ………………..
e.     The bottom portion is called ………………
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
29.
Title:  GIANT BUBBLES
RELATED HOW-TO-INFO:
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT:
·        6 cups water (Distilled is best)
·        3/4 cup corn syrup (Karo Light)
·        2 cups Joy (or Dawn) dish washing liquid
·        assortment of plastic lids of different sizes
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:
        1. Make a bubble mix.  Use an assortment of plastic lids of different sizes, several straws, a cup of water and a large plastic plate or other container to catch any overflow bubble mix.
        2. To make big bubbles that last, you need to have something to keep them on. You need to make and use a bubble stand. To make a bubble stand, use a large plastic plate to catch any bubble mix you will spill, and then put the top of a large butter lid (any other plastic lid with a lip on it will work) in the center of the plate. Always check to make sure that the lid is smooth and does not have any sharp defects.
        3. The next step is to put bubble mix into the butter lid until the mix comes just up to the edge
4. Once the bubble mix covers the edge of the lid, dip the straw in the cup of bubble mix to get the end of the straw wet. Next
place one end of the straw into the bubble mix in the butter lid. Keeping the straw in the mixture, slowly blow into the straw
        5. Once a bubble starts to form, you have to position the end of the straw so that you can keep blowing air into the bubble, and you can keep the wet part of the straw in contact with the surface of the bubble. With practice this will become relatively easy, and you will be able to blow some pretty big bubbles which will sit on the edge of the butter lid.


EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

EVALUATION:
1.      Have you ever made bubbles before? (answer may vary)
____________________________________________________________________________________________
2.      How many bubbles were you able to  make? (answers may vary)
____________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      What kind of bubbles were you able to make? Big or small? (answers may vary)
____________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
30.
Title:  COLOR FAVORITES
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        My Book of Science Experiments, page 50.
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        White and pink cardboard
·        Scissors
·        Black and red felt-tip pens
·        Wire
·        Modeling clay
·        Honey
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.      Cut two pink and two white flower shapes like the ones below.  Draw red “honey guides” on the two pink flowers.  Draw black “honey guides” on one of the white flowers.
2.      Bend wires to make stems and push them through the centers of the flowers, using modeling clay to keep them in place.  Push the wires into the ground outside near some real flowers.
3.      Put a blob of honey in the center of the all-white flower and one of the pink flowers.
4.      Watch carefully from a meter (yard) or so away.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
1.      List on the table your observations
COLOR OF FLOWER
NUMBER OF INSECTS
1.  Pink (no honey blob)
2.  White (with honey blob)
3.  Pink (with honey blob)
2.      Are insects more attracted to the white or colored flowers?
____________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      Are insects color blind or not?
____________________________________________________________________________________________
4.      Why insects are not color blind?
____________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
31.
Title:  STRATIFICATION
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        THE Big Book of Science Experiments vol. 2, page 77
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        Soil
·        Bottle
·        Water
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.      Collect soil of different types in a bottle
2.      Add some water
3.      Shake it well
4.      Leave aside for some hours
WHAT’S GOING ON?
The soil separates into different layers like the finer grains on the top and coarser ones at the bottom.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
1.      Make a drawing of the layered soil in your bottle.

 

 

2.      What does the bottom layer made of?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      What does the surface layer made of?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
31.
Title:  COLOR YOUR WORLD
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        My Book of Science Experiments, page 47.
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        3 mirrors of the same size
·        white paper
·        sticky tape
·        colored paper shapes
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.      Tape three mirrors together so they form three-sided tube.  Position them on  white paper.
2.      Drop some colored paper shapes into the tube and look at the patterns they make.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

 

 

EVALUATION:
          Make a drawing of your kaleidoscope

 

 

2.    What happens if you move the shapes with a pencil?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
32.
Title:  LEAVES HERE & THERE
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        Botany Manual by Sharon Ramos and Imelda Perez
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        Variety of leaves with stalk
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.      Examine the leaves.
2.     


Categorize each under alternate, opposite, and whorl arrangement.

EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:
EVALUATION:
1.      Complete the table
Alternate leaf
Opposite leaf
Whorl leaf
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
2.      Describe an alternate leaf arrangement.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      Describe an opposite leaf arrangement.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
4.      Describe a whorl leaf arrangement.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
33.
Title:  GREAT WALL
BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        Experiment.com
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        Microscope
·        Alium cepa
·        Glass slide
·        Cover slip
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

1.    Scrape the thin upper epidermis of the alium cepa.
2.    Make a wet mount of this.
3.    View under the low power objective, then later in the high power objective.


EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

EVALUATION:
1.      Make a drawing of the specimen as seen through the microscope.

 

 

2.      Describe the cell wall.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3.      What organelle is being surrounded by the cell wall?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
34.
Title:  QUICKSAND SCIENCE

RELATED HOW-TO INFO: 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
·        Stevespanler.com
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
·        One box of cornstarch (16 oz
·        Large mixing bowl
·        Cookie sheet, square cake pan, or something similar
·        Pitcher of water
·        Spoon
·        Gallon size zipper-lock bag
·        Newspaper or a plastic drip cloth to cover the floor
Water
·        Food Coloring
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE:

        1. Pour approximately 1/4 of the box (about 4 oz.) of cornstarch into the mixing bowl and slowly add about a half a cup of water. Stir. Sometimes it is easier to mix the cornstarch and water with your bare hands (of course, this only adds to the fun).
2. Continue adding cornstarch and water in small amounts until you get a mixture that has the consistency of honey. It may take a little work to get the consistency just right, but you will eventually end up mixing one box of cornstarch with roughly 1 to 2 cups of water. Notice that the mixture gets thicker or more viscous as you add more cornstarch.
3. Sink your hand into the bowl of “quicksand” and notice its unusual consistency. Compare what it feels like to move your hand around slowly and then very fast. You can’t move your hand around very fast! In fact, the faster you thrash around, the more like a SOLID the gooey stuff becomes. Sink you entire hand into the goo and try to grab the fluid and pull it up. That’s the sensation of sinking in quicksand!
4. Drop a plastic toy animal into the cornstarch mixture and then try to get it out. It’s pretty tough even for an experienced quicksand mixologist.
        WHAT’S GOING ON??
        The cornstarch and water mixture acts like a solid sometimes, and a liquid at other times? Actually, this concoction is an example of what is called a non-Newtonian fluid – a fluid that defies Isaac Newton’s law of viscosity. All fluids have a property known as viscosity. It is the measurable thickness or resistance to flow in a fluid. Honey and ketchup are liquids that have a high resistance to flow. Water has a low viscosity. Newton said that viscosity is a function of temperature. So, if you heat honey, the viscosity is less than that of cold honey. The cornstarch and water mixture and quicksand are both examples of non-Newtonian fluids because their viscosity changes when stress or a force is applied.
EXPERIMENTAL SET UP:

EVALUATION:
1.      How did your hand feel when you placed it in the mixture?
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2.       You tried to move your hand, describe what happened.
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3.      What happened to the toy you drop into the mixture?
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4.      Was it easy to pull the toy back into the surface?
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CONCLUSION:
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10 thoughts on “ESL first graders science activity

  1. Thank you for sharing your brand new website Madam Mitchelle Juaban-Dominguez. It’s nice. I will browse it later when I’ll not be too busy. Keep it up!!! 🙂

  2. welcome!! this is actually not yet done. I still have 2 more books of science activities I need to post. I'm quite busy. But I'll find the time..

    Thank you as well Anna!

  3. I also copy the address of your blog in my facebok account so that many teachers can browse/use your prepared activities…salamat po!

  4. Hello Anna! How are you? Of course, I do remember you and I am very happy to hear from you. You can definitely use the activities. You can even modify them to suit your classroom needs. I also have another post about different science worksheets, although I have not updated them yet. But I will find the time to do so.

    1. Thank you po..I will follow your blog so that I will be updated with your new worksheets.I really learned a lot from you.My Botany Notebooks are still preserved as my reference. Keep o smiling be safe always!

  5. Hi ma'am I am Anna and I will also ask your permission to copy and use some of the activities for my students. I hope you still remember me as one of your students in HCDC.. Thank you for the best inputs we learned from you.

  6. Hello ma'am….this is nathaniel…..I'm not sure if you and my professor before in college(HCDC) are the same. But, anyways I just want to ask permission from you if I could use your science activities above for my students.

    Thanks!

    1. Hi Nathaniel! Yes, I do believe I am that person you are referring to(big smile). And as for the activities, the answer of course is “Yes” you can use them. But, can you help me spread the word. Share this blog site with friends and co-teachers who are interested. I am also going to be asking for suggestions on topics that you and your friends would want to do experiments with. You can also check my other posts with worksheets.

      Wow… how long has it been? I am very happy to hear from former students of mine doing well with their teaching careers. I wish you all the best!

      Ms. M. Juaban

    2. Hello again ma'am….So happy to have communication with you again. I always admire you as a teacher….and proud to be your student. With your request ma'am, It will be a great privilege to share your blog site to my co-teachers. I will tell this to my friends who happened also to be your students before…:). With regard to to the topics ma'am, I will just post it here after I can share this to my co-teachers….so we can decide as a group what interesting experiments we want to do in our class.

      By the way ma'am, just asking if you have an FB account?

      Thank you again ma'am for the reply….God bless you always ma'am.

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